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    The Forsyth Institute Joins the Boston Biomedical Innovation Center To Further Healthcare Research and Commercialization of Medical Technologies

    BOSTON, JUNE 16, 2015 – The Boston Biomedical Innovation Center (B-BIC), a healthcare consortium designed to accelerate commercialization of biomedical technologies, and the Forsyth Institute, a not-for-profit organization pioneering biomedical research for new diagnostics, devices and therapies, today announce that Forsyth will join B-BIC as a Participating Member.

    BOSTON, JUNE 16, 2015 – The Boston Biomedical Innovation Center (B-BIC), a healthcare consortium designed to accelerate commercialization of biomedical technologies, and the Forsyth Institute, a not-for-profit organization pioneering biomedical research for new diagnostics, devices and therapies, today announce that Forsyth will join B-BIC as a Participating Member.

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    Tuberculosis bacteria hide in the low oxygen niches of bone marrow stem cells

    A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed light on latent tuberculosis and the bacteria’s ability to hide in stem cells. Some bone marrow stem cells reside in low oxygen (hypoxia) zones. These specialized zones are secured as immune cells and toxic chemicals cannot reach this zone. Hypoxia- activated cell signaling pathways may also protect the stem cells from dying or ageing. A new study led by Forsyth Scientist Dr.

    A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed light on latent tuberculosis and the bacteria’s ability to hide in stem cells. Some bone marrow stem cells reside in low oxygen (hypoxia) zones. These specialized zones are secured as immune cells and toxic chemicals cannot reach this zone. Hypoxia- activated cell signaling pathways may also protect the stem cells from dying or ageing. A new study led by Forsyth Scientist Dr.

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    Dr. Bob Soparkar Honored for 30-year Contribution to Children’s Oral Health Worldwide

    The Forsyth Institute Honors Lexington Local for 30-year Contribution to Children’s Oral Health Worldwide

    Dr. Pramod “Bob” Soparkar is recognized at Forsyth’s annual ‘Taste & Toast’ fundraiser, June 4

    On Thursday night, Bob Soparkar, BDS, DMD, was recognized by the Massachusetts science community for his significant contributions to global oral health and advocacy on behalf of children.

    The Forsyth Institute Honors Lexington Local for 30-year Contribution to Children’s Oral Health Worldwide

    Dr. Pramod “Bob” Soparkar is recognized at Forsyth’s annual ‘Taste & Toast’ fundraiser, June 4

    On Thursday night, Bob Soparkar, BDS, DMD, was recognized by the Massachusetts science community for his significant contributions to global oral health and advocacy on behalf of children.

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    The Connection between Mouth Bacteria and Inflammation in Heart Disease

    In a review article published in Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism on April 16, researchers summarize the latest clinical evidence supporting a link between oral infections, which are caused by the bacteria in our mouth, and heart disease, and they emphasize the important role of inflammation in both of these conditions.

    In a review article published in Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism on April 16, researchers summarize the latest clinical evidence supporting a link between oral infections, which are caused by the bacteria in our mouth, and heart disease, and they emphasize the important role of inflammation in both of these conditions.

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    Forsyth Study Details How Gum Disease Treatment Can Prevent Heart Disease

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 14 – A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connection between the mouth and heart.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 14 – A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connection between the mouth and heart.

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    Significant Research from the Forsyth Institute Explains Why Popular Antacids May Increase Chance of Bone Fractures

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., March 26, 2015 – Newly published research from the Forsyth Institute details a discovery explaining why the 100 million Americans estimated to be taking prescription and over-the-counter antacid and heartburn medications may be at an increased risk of bone fractures.  

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., March 26, 2015 – Newly published research from the Forsyth Institute details a discovery explaining why the 100 million Americans estimated to be taking prescription and over-the-counter antacid and heartburn medications may be at an increased risk of bone fractures.  

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    ​$4.8M MLSC grant to fund Mass. Host-Microbiome Center

    The Forsyth Institute and Brigham & Women’s Hospital were awarded over $4.8 million to fund the creation of the Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center, which will accelerate practical understanding of how personal microbial communities interact to promote health or cause disease.

    The Forsyth Institute and Brigham & Women’s Hospital were awarded over $4.8 million to fund the creation of the Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center, which will accelerate practical understanding of how personal microbial communities interact to promote health or cause disease.

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    Fighting Co-Infection in HIV/AIDS Patients: Forsyth Institute Research Team Identifies Bacteria Previously Not Known to Reside in Healthy Mouths

    A research team from The Forsyth Institute has identified for the first time the presence of a group of bacteria that was not previously believed to reside naturally in the mouths of healthy individuals.

    A research team from The Forsyth Institute has identified for the first time the presence of a group of bacteria that was not previously believed to reside naturally in the mouths of healthy individuals.

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    Forsyth Research Featured in Boston Magazine

    Learn more about the role of inflammation in the body.

    Learn more about the role of inflammation in the body.

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    Living with Type 2 Diabetes: Forsyth Institute Research Team Identifies New Potential Key to Improving Quality of Life

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., January 14 -- Scientists at The Forsyth Institute have identified a new potential key to managing inflammation in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Inflammation is recognized as a major link between Type 2 diabetes and many complications that negatively impact a patient’s quality of life, such as periodontal and cardiovascular diseases and arthritis. Reducing inflammation in the body leads to healthier outcomes for people with Type 2 diabetes.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., January 14 -- Scientists at The Forsyth Institute have identified a new potential key to managing inflammation in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Inflammation is recognized as a major link between Type 2 diabetes and many complications that negatively impact a patient’s quality of life, such as periodontal and cardiovascular diseases and arthritis. Reducing inflammation in the body leads to healthier outcomes for people with Type 2 diabetes.