News

  • News

    Forsyth Research Featured in Boston Magazine

    Learn more about the role of inflammation in the body.

    Learn more about the role of inflammation in the body.

  • News

    Living with Type 2 Diabetes: Forsyth Institute Research Team Identifies New Potential Key to Improving Quality of Life

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., January 14 -- Scientists at The Forsyth Institute have identified a new potential key to managing inflammation in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Inflammation is recognized as a major link between Type 2 diabetes and many complications that negatively impact a patient’s quality of life, such as periodontal and cardiovascular diseases and arthritis. Reducing inflammation in the body leads to healthier outcomes for people with Type 2 diabetes.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., January 14 -- Scientists at The Forsyth Institute have identified a new potential key to managing inflammation in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Inflammation is recognized as a major link between Type 2 diabetes and many complications that negatively impact a patient’s quality of life, such as periodontal and cardiovascular diseases and arthritis. Reducing inflammation in the body leads to healthier outcomes for people with Type 2 diabetes.

  • News

    Scientists' unique system of oral vaccine delivery to address global health threats

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., December 15 -- Scientists at The Forsyth Institute and Tufts University have succeeded in describing and validating a unique system of oral vaccine delivery using a common bacteria found in the mouth. Findings published today by Elsevier in Microbes and Infection identify Streptococcus mitis as a successful vector for oral mucosal immunization, and further research will determine its potential clinical use in tuberculosis vaccine development.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., December 15 -- Scientists at The Forsyth Institute and Tufts University have succeeded in describing and validating a unique system of oral vaccine delivery using a common bacteria found in the mouth. Findings published today by Elsevier in Microbes and Infection identify Streptococcus mitis as a successful vector for oral mucosal immunization, and further research will determine its potential clinical use in tuberculosis vaccine development.

  • News

    Dr. Max Goodson is Interviewed on NECN

    Dr. Max Goodson was recently featured on NECN. In this interview, Dr. Goodson highlights the potential of saliva for preventive healthcare.https://vimeo.com/113425692.   

    If you'd like to support this important work, and the Forsyth Center for Salivary Diagnostics, you can make a tax-deductable donation online.  

    Dr. Max Goodson was recently featured on NECN. In this interview, Dr. Goodson highlights the potential of saliva for preventive healthcare.https://vimeo.com/113425692.   

    If you'd like to support this important work, and the Forsyth Center for Salivary Diagnostics, you can make a tax-deductable donation online.  

  • News

    Forsyth Hosts Grand Opening Ceremony for Salivary Diagnostic Center

    Today the Forsyth Institute officially opened its new Salivary Diagnostics Center in Cambridge, MA. 

    Today the Forsyth Institute officially opened its new Salivary Diagnostics Center in Cambridge, MA. 

  • News

    Apply Now for the HSDM/Forsyth Research Academy

    Harvard School of Dental Medicine and The Forsyth Institute are pleased to announce a joint Research Academy which will offer an unparalleled three-year (minimum) structured Doctor of Medical Sciences (DMSc-only) research-intensive degree in oral biology.

    Harvard School of Dental Medicine and The Forsyth Institute are pleased to announce a joint Research Academy which will offer an unparalleled three-year (minimum) structured Doctor of Medical Sciences (DMSc-only) research-intensive degree in oral biology.

  • News

    Communication between Bacteria from Nostril/Skin Microbiome Can Influence Pathogen Behavior

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., July 22, 2014 —  A team of scientists has made an important discovery about the molecular interactions that occur between generally benign species of Propionibacterium bacteria and the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the cause of most “staph” infections. These bacterial species are commonly found in the human nostrils and, also, on human skin. S.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., July 22, 2014 —  A team of scientists has made an important discovery about the molecular interactions that occur between generally benign species of Propionibacterium bacteria and the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the cause of most “staph” infections. These bacterial species are commonly found in the human nostrils and, also, on human skin. S.

  • News

    Floyd Dewhirst to Receive the 2014 IADR Distinguished Scientist Award in Research in Oral Biology

    Alexandria, Va., USA - The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) will present Floyd Dewhirst with the 2014 IADR Distinguished Scientist Award in Research in Oral Biology. He will be recognized during the Opening Ceremonies of the 92nd IADR General Session & Exhibition, held in conjunction with the IADR Africa/Middle East Regional Meeting, June 25, 2014, in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Alexandria, Va., USA - The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) will present Floyd Dewhirst with the 2014 IADR Distinguished Scientist Award in Research in Oral Biology. He will be recognized during the Opening Ceremonies of the 92nd IADR General Session & Exhibition, held in conjunction with the IADR Africa/Middle East Regional Meeting, June 25, 2014, in Cape Town, South Africa.

  • News

    Computational Technique Provides New Insight into Oral Microbiome

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 24, 2014 — Scientists have applied a new technique to comprehensively analyze the human oral microbiome—providing greater knowledge of the diversity of the bacteria in the mouth. For the first-time, scientists can provide high-resolution bacterial classification at the sub-species level. This work will enable researchers to more closely examine the role of bacterial communities in health and disease.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 24, 2014 — Scientists have applied a new technique to comprehensively analyze the human oral microbiome—providing greater knowledge of the diversity of the bacteria in the mouth. For the first-time, scientists can provide high-resolution bacterial classification at the sub-species level. This work will enable researchers to more closely examine the role of bacterial communities in health and disease.

  • Archive

    Salivary Biomarkers Highlight Metabolic Disease Risk in Children

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 11, 2014 -- Scientists have announced results from a large-scale study that uses saliva as a tool for identifying children who are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. This team of investigators found significantly altered levels of salivary biomarkers in obese children.  By testing this non-invasive approach to the study of metabolic diseases, the researchers hope to develop simplified screening procedures to identify people at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 11, 2014 -- Scientists have announced results from a large-scale study that uses saliva as a tool for identifying children who are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. This team of investigators found significantly altered levels of salivary biomarkers in obese children.  By testing this non-invasive approach to the study of metabolic diseases, the researchers hope to develop simplified screening procedures to identify people at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.