News

  • News

    Computational Technique Provides New Insight into Oral Microbiome

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 24, 2014 — Scientists have applied a new technique to comprehensively analyze the human oral microbiome—providing greater knowledge of the diversity of the bacteria in the mouth. For the first-time, scientists can provide high-resolution bacterial classification at the sub-species level. This work will enable researchers to more closely examine the role of bacterial communities in health and disease.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 24, 2014 — Scientists have applied a new technique to comprehensively analyze the human oral microbiome—providing greater knowledge of the diversity of the bacteria in the mouth. For the first-time, scientists can provide high-resolution bacterial classification at the sub-species level. This work will enable researchers to more closely examine the role of bacterial communities in health and disease.

  • Archive

    Salivary Biomarkers Highlight Metabolic Disease Risk in Children

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 11, 2014 -- Scientists have announced results from a large-scale study that uses saliva as a tool for identifying children who are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. This team of investigators found significantly altered levels of salivary biomarkers in obese children.  By testing this non-invasive approach to the study of metabolic diseases, the researchers hope to develop simplified screening procedures to identify people at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 11, 2014 -- Scientists have announced results from a large-scale study that uses saliva as a tool for identifying children who are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. This team of investigators found significantly altered levels of salivary biomarkers in obese children.  By testing this non-invasive approach to the study of metabolic diseases, the researchers hope to develop simplified screening procedures to identify people at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

  • News

    Gala Raises $170,815 For Science and Community Programs

    Chefs from 14 restaurants joined the Forsyth Institute in honoring Dr. Anthony Volpe and Joanne Chang at the inaugural event A Taste & A Toast event on June 5th. The evening raised $167,000 to support Forsyth’s mission of improving oral and overall health.

    Guest sampled tasting from the following renowned local restaurants. Participants included:

    Chefs from 14 restaurants joined the Forsyth Institute in honoring Dr. Anthony Volpe and Joanne Chang at the inaugural event A Taste & A Toast event on June 5th. The evening raised $167,000 to support Forsyth’s mission of improving oral and overall health.

    Guest sampled tasting from the following renowned local restaurants. Participants included:

  • News

    Scientists Develop New Approach for Sampling Gut Bacteria

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., May 19, 2014 -- Scientists at Forsyth, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard School of Public Health have developed a new protocol for collecting saliva and stool samples for genomic and transcriptomic analyses. This method eliminates the need for specialized personnel and facilities while keeping the sample intact.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., May 19, 2014 -- Scientists at Forsyth, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard School of Public Health have developed a new protocol for collecting saliva and stool samples for genomic and transcriptomic analyses. This method eliminates the need for specialized personnel and facilities while keeping the sample intact.

  • News

    Protein Plays Key Role in Infection by Oral Pathogen

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., March 24 — Scientists at Forsyth, along with a colleague from  Northwestern University, have discovered that the protein, Transglutaminase 2 (TG2), is a key component in the process of gum disease. TG2 is widely distributed inside and outside of human cells. The scientists found that blocking some associations of TG2 prevents the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) from adhering to cells.

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., March 24 — Scientists at Forsyth, along with a colleague from  Northwestern University, have discovered that the protein, Transglutaminase 2 (TG2), is a key component in the process of gum disease. TG2 is widely distributed inside and outside of human cells. The scientists found that blocking some associations of TG2 prevents the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) from adhering to cells.

  • News

    Linking Discovery and Patient Care

    Forsyth's Center for Clinical and Translational Research is focused on meeting that goal.Thomas Van Dyke, DDS, PhD, and his team joined the Institute in 2010 to expand Forsyth's team and forge new partnership throughout industry and academia.

    Forsyth's Center for Clinical and Translational Research is focused on meeting that goal.Thomas Van Dyke, DDS, PhD, and his team joined the Institute in 2010 to expand Forsyth's team and forge new partnership throughout industry and academia.

  • News

    A New Home for Forsyth

    Our new home at 245 First Street in Cambridge includes state-of-the-art laboratories, a new research clinic, meeting spaces and administrative offices. This fall we will also open a dental practice to serve the needs of people who work and live in Kendall Square.

    Our new home at 245 First Street in Cambridge includes state-of-the-art laboratories, a new research clinic, meeting spaces and administrative offices. This fall we will also open a dental practice to serve the needs of people who work and live in Kendall Square.

  • News

    A New Paradigm of Bone Loss

    Then Forsyth researchers published an unprecedented finding, proving that the major cause is the protein RANKL, activated by an immune response. This finding also has significant implications for other diseases that cause bone loss, including osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Then Forsyth researchers published an unprecedented finding, proving that the major cause is the protein RANKL, activated by an immune response. This finding also has significant implications for other diseases that cause bone loss, including osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  • News

    Breakthrough Tools for Understanding the Microbiology of the Mouth

    Forsyth researchers Floyd E. Dewhirst, DDS, PhD, and Bruce J. Paster, PhD, have pioneered not only the identification of the totality of the oral microbial universe, but the development of powerful tools so scientists can share information about them. These innovations are significant achievements with broad application to oral health, general medicine, biomedical science, public health and industry.

    Forsyth researchers Floyd E. Dewhirst, DDS, PhD, and Bruce J. Paster, PhD, have pioneered not only the identification of the totality of the oral microbial universe, but the development of powerful tools so scientists can share information about them. These innovations are significant achievements with broad application to oral health, general medicine, biomedical science, public health and industry.

  • News

    Forsyth Scientists Trigger Cancer-Like Response from Embryonic Stem Cells

    Scientists from The Forsyth Institute, working with collaborators at Tufts and Tuebingen Universities, have discovered a new control over embryonic stem cells’ behavior. The researchers disrupted a natural bioelectrical mechanism within frog embryonic stem cells and trigged a cancer-like response, including increased cell growth, change in cell shape, and invasion of the major body organs. This research shows that electrical signals are a powerful control mechanism that can be used to modulate cell behavior.

    Scientists from The Forsyth Institute, working with collaborators at Tufts and Tuebingen Universities, have discovered a new control over embryonic stem cells’ behavior. The researchers disrupted a natural bioelectrical mechanism within frog embryonic stem cells and trigged a cancer-like response, including increased cell growth, change in cell shape, and invasion of the major body organs. This research shows that electrical signals are a powerful control mechanism that can be used to modulate cell behavior.