A New Home for Forsyth

  • After a century at 140 the Fenway in Boston, the Forsyth Institute relocated to the heart of Kendall Square Cambridge, an epicenter of biomedical research.
  • Monday, February 3, 2014
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Our new home at 245 First Street in Cambridge includes state-of-the-art laboratories, a new research clinic, meeting spaces and administrative offices. This fall we will also open a dental practice to serve the needs of people who work and live in Kendall Square.

Dr. Philip Stashenko, President and CEO of The Forsyth Institute said, "After evaluating many possibilities we found that 245 First Street was the best option for Forsyth. We are very excited about our new location, which will enable Forsyth to establish additional collaborations and thrive into its second century."

A Long History of Safeguarding Health

Originally named The Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children, Forsyth was founded in 1910 and for its first fifty years focused primarily on the oral health needs of Boston's disadvantaged children. Forsyth embarked on its first scientific research program in the early 1930's, and by the 1950's was a pioneer in discovering the relationships between nutrition and specific bacteria in causing dental decay, as well as establishing the protective effects of fluoride. Forsyth continued to expand its commitment to research since that time, and is today the world's leading independent nonprofit research organization dedicated to both oral health and its connections to overall health.

At the its new facility Forsyth will conduct biomedical research in molecular biology, microbiology, immunology, skeletal biology, development biology, tissue regeneration and clinical research. In the Forsyth scientists are involved in a wide range of projects, including the identification of the 600 or more bacteria that inhabit the human mouth, the role of specific bacteria in causing oral diseases, and the connections between oral and systemic diseases such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, Crohn's disease, pancreatic cancer and Alzheimer's disease.